Technology Integration Companies

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With almost half of Rancho signing up to install RSF Connect, many homeowners are using this opportunity to upgrade their in-house technology. And to fully utilize RSF Connect’s gigabit speeds, your home network wiring and network switches may need to be updated. Similarly your WiFi wireless network is probably not up to snuff unless you upgraded it recently.

From talking to the RSF Connect installers and others, I’ve heard some horror stories of technology contractors that simply did not know what they were doing. One homeowner had their house recently rewired, but the installer used obsolete Cat 5 cable. Another found that their “network cable” had been daisy chained from outlet to outlet, something you used to do for phone cabling 30 years ago, but never for networking cabling (it will not work at all). 

So here are a list of IT companies that I’ve looked into. They’re all different in their specific services offered, but they will all do a competent job for basic network upgrades. Be forewarned. While technology costs keep declining for some truly mind blowing manufactured products, labor costs keep climbing especially for such specialized skills. Don’t expect services from these folks to be inexpensive.

Lightworks

Large company in business for 29 years. Does both commercial and high end/large home integration. Capabilities:

  • Electrical with on staff electricians
  • Lighting design, controls and installation
  • Network design, cabling, monitoring
  • WiFi design and monitoring
  • Security video
  • Security system design and installation, hand off to monitoring company
  • AV design and installation
  • Whole house control systems

Contact Ron Roberge (Integration Sales) at 858-999-6115, ron@sdlightworks.com, Website: https://www.sdlightworks.com/

inBuilding Services Corporation

Medium sized company that mostly does commercial building integration, but also does high end/large homes. They recently helped Mille Fleur with a technology upgrade. Capabilities:

  • Network design, cabling and installation
  • Wifi Design and installation
  • Access control systems 
  • Security cameras

Contact Joe Russell (Founder, CEO) at 619-823-7400, sales@inbuilding.com, Website: https://inbuilding.com/

Kiwi Audio Visual

This is a high end/large home/commercial AV integrator that also does network integration. They have so far helped 20+ covenant homes connect to RSF Connect. Capabilities:

  • AV design, construction, installation
  • Lighting control systems
  • Network design, installation
  • WiFi design, installation
  • Home automation
  • Whole home audio
  • Custom home theaters
  • Gate and home access solutions
  • Security cameras

Contact Willie Dent (CEO) at 760-931-9922, wdent@kiwiav.com, Website: https://kiwiav.com/

Transpac Consulting Group

Small company that’s been around for 24 years that mostly does IT consulting. These are the long time consultants that the RSF Association uses for their information technology. Needless to say, they are very familiar with RSF Connect. In the past, they’ve worked with residents to get AT&T fiber pulled to various covenant houses (not cheap!). Capabilities:

  • Hosted help desk
  • Network cabling design, installation
  • Wifi design, installation, monitoring
  • Security cameras

Contact Ryan Rossiter (CEO) at 858 717-3929, sales@TransPacCG.com, Website: http://www.transpaccg.com/

Sound Automation

Small company that has helped lots of local residents interface with RSF Connect including some new house builds a year ago. Capabilities:

  • AV design, installation
  • Network design, cabling, monitoring
  • WiFi install and monitoring
  • Whole house control systems
  • Lighting control systems
  • Security cameras

Contact Steven Mangan (CEO) at 619-818-7121, steve@ca-ahs.com, Website: http://www.soundautomation.net/

What Cable Should I Use?

I’ll finish off this article with one important thing you want to get right: cabling. If you are retrofitting or installing new network cable, make sure you use Cat 6 or Cat 6a cable. Since new house wiring will probably be used for the next 25 years or so, you shouldn’t install Cat 5e, which tops out at 1 Gbps, and certainly never Cat 5, which no one should be using anymore. If you have Cat 5e in your walls, it’ll work fine at gigabit speeds, so no need to upgrade now, but it won’t be able to make the leap to 10 Gbps when that day comes. And I can guarantee you that within the next 25 years, people will be using 10 Gbps Internet connections (don’t worry, RSF Connect will able to easily upgrade to 10 Gbps when that time comes).

As you can see from the chart, Cat 6 cable does work at 10 Gbps, but only at lengths up to 55 meters (think 55 big paces). For 10,000 sq ft+ houses, you’ll have runs that exceed 55 meters, and thus you should be using Cat 6a (or Cat 7 or fiber) for at least those runs. The cost difference isn’t huge between the cable types once you include installation labor, so opting for Cat 6a for new installs may be prudent.